Politics·Video

Conrad Black: Stephen Harper has 'run out of steam'

Conrad Black says he fears the Conservatives are vulnerable to the "it's time for a change" argument. The author and controversial former media baron also says he intends to reapply for his Canadian citizenship. Watch his full interview with Evan Solomon from Power & Politics.

Promoting his new book on Canada's history, Black praises Harper's 'competence,' but says he lacks originality

Conrad Black Interview

7 years ago
15:16
Controversial former newspaper owner Conrad Black discusses his new book and his views on Canada 15:16

Controversial former newspaper owner Conrad Black says he fears Stephen Harper has "run out of steam."

Speaking on CBC News Network's Power & Politics, Black praised the prime minister for his competence, but said "I don't see anything original... it's starting to look like a government that likes to be the government but isn't really animated by what it wants to do."

Black warned this may make the Conservative party vulnerable to the "it's time for a change" argument. 

Speaking to host Evan Solomon about his recently published history of Canada, Rise to Greatness, Black also says he does not regret giving up his Canadian citizenship. But, he adds, he never intended to give it up permanently. 

"I will take it back. I've been interrupted for 10 years by this nonsense in the United States but... I will apply to be a Canadian citizen again."

Black was convicted of fraud in the United States in 2007. In Canada, he caused controversy when he called his native country a "plain vanilla place."

In the interview with Solomon, he made a point of clarifying those earlier remarks. "I like vanilla as a flavour," Black said.

Watch the full interview with Conrad Black.

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