Politics

CBSA workers to hold strike votes next week, possibly jeopardizing border reopening

A union representing 9,000 Canadian Border Service Agency personnel says Canada-U.S. border reopening plans are in jeopardy as their workers prepare for strike votes starting next week.

Talks between the CBSA and the union broke off in December

The union representing workers at the Canada Border Service Agency says its members have been without a contract for the past three years. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

A union representing 9,000 Canadian Border Service Agency personnel says Canada-U.S. border reopening plans are in jeopardy as their workers prepare for strike votes starting next week.

The Public Service Alliance of Canada says 5,500 border services officers, 2,000 headquarters staff and other workers at Canada Post facilities and in inland enforcement jobs will begin strike votes on June 16 and continue them throughout the month.

PSAC said their members have been without a contract for nearly three years. Talks with the CBSA and Treasury Board broke off in December.

PSAC said the two sides have been unable to agree on better protections for staff that would address a "toxic" workplace culture and bring them in line with other law enforcement personnel across Canada.

The two sides also appeared before a public interest commission in May to present arguments on compensation but are still waiting to receive its recommendations.

PSAC's strike talk comes as New York congressman Brian Higgins says Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Joe Biden will discuss plans to reopen the Canada-U.S. border at the G7 summit this week.

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