Photos

COVID-19 pandemic alters daily life across Canada and around the world

From deserted streets and empty airports to self-isolation and social distancing, take a look at how the pandemic has impacted people's lives and created an eerie new normal for millions of people in Canada and around the world.

Empty streets, squares, airports and hockey rinks reflect unprecedented social distancing, self-isolation

Scroll down for a look at how the coronavirus pandemic has changed daily life in major cities in Canada and around the world.

(Andrew Kelly/Reuters, Ben Nelms/CBC)

Toronto deserted

A single person walks past Toronto's Union Station during what is usually peak afternoon rush hour on March 18.

(Craig Chivers/CBC)

Here, the express TTC bus on University Avenue is seen completely empty.

(Craig Chivers/CBC)

No flights or hockey games in Winnipeg

Winnipeg's Richardson International Airport sits empty amid the COVID-19 outbreak. 

(Trevor Brine/CBC)

The Heritage Victoria Community Centre in Winnipeg is also closed due to COVID-19.

(Tyson Koschik/CBC)

Shoppers stock up

Shoppers in Port Coquitlam, B.C., line up at Costco to stock up on food and supplies following a recommendation from health officials that Canadians should limit non-essential travel and self-isolate as much as possible to combat the spread of COVID-19.

(Yvette Brend/CBC)

The influx of shoppers left the shelves bare at many stores and supermarkets across the country, including at this Sobeys location in Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

(Brian McInnis/CBC)

A woman walks past graffiti urging people to wash their hands in downtown Vancouver on March 17.

(Ben Nelms/CBC)

Life in Italy changes drastically

Personal trainer Antonietta Orsini carries out an exercise class for her neighbours from her balcony in Rome while the entire country of Italy is in lockdown.

(Remo Casilli/Reuters)

Here, the Duomo square in Milan is deserted on the second day of the country's unprecedented lockdown.

(Flavio Lo Scalzo/Reuters)

Empty NYC

The streets of Manhattan were eerily empty on March 17 following the coronavirus outbreak.

(Jeenah Moon/Reuters)

The Brooklyn Bridge was similarly deserted. 

(Eduardo Munoz/Reuters)

Here, ballet dancer and performer Ashlee Montague wears a gas mask while she dances in a virtually empty Times Square.

(Andrew Kelly/Reuters)

Europe adjusts to a new reality

In London, a usually bustling Westminster Bridge is relatively empty.

(Hannah McKay/Reuters)

Jozef Gouwy, 93, looks at a robot made by ZoraBots for elderly people at home, so they can virtually communicate with their loved ones, amid the ban on visits to combat the spread of coronavirus in Ostend, Belgium.

(Yves Herman/Reuters)

Here, the Louvre museum in Paris is deserted after a lockdown was imposed in France.

(Christian Hartmann/Reuters)

Private weddings in Israel 

Israeli couple Roni Ben-Ari and Yonatan Meushar dance as they get married at Ein Hemed Forest Wedding Venue, where free, small-scale weddings are being offered for young couples whose weddings cannot take place as planned due to restrictions imposed by the government to fight the coronavirus.

(Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

Air pollution drops

A combination photo of the Woodlands Causeway between Singapore and Malaysia, before and after Malaysia imposed a lockdown on travel over the coronavirus outbreak on March 17. 

(Edgar Su/Reuters)

Measures around the world to restrict gatherings, close public venues and encourage people to work from home in the battle against COVID-19 are having quantifiable consequences for our environment, according to scientists, with large drops in the amount of nitrogen dioxide seen over Italy and China.

Here, hundreds of boats sit docked at the Elliott Bay Marina in Seattle.

(Lindsey Wasson/Reuters)

Empty flights

An air traveller sits among empty seats on a Delta flight to San Francisco at JFK International Airport in New York after further cases of coronavirus were confirmed in the state on March 17.

(Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)