Nicole Ireland

Nicole Ireland is a CBC News journalist with a special interest in health and social justice stories. Based in Toronto, she has lived and worked in Thunder Bay, Ont.; Iqaluit, Nunavut; and Beirut, Lebanon.

Latest from Nicole Ireland

Toronto photo radar units start issuing speeding tickets today. Here's what's happening across the GTA

The city of Toronto is using 50 automated speed enforcement units to catch drivers going too fast in community safety and school zones — and other municipalities across the GTA aren't far behind.
THE DOSE

Potential COVID-19 vaccine has re-energized anti-vaccination groups, health experts warn

Anti-vaccination groups have already launched co-ordinated campaigns to foster fear among people who have questions about the safety of potential coronavirus vaccines, and public health officials need to start combating misinformation now, scientists say.
THE DOSE

Thousands of volunteers come forward to offer mental health support during COVID-19

As Canadians continue to grapple with an unprecedented level of stress as the COVID-19 pandemic wears on, empathy can be an effective coping strategy in maintaining mental wellness, experts say.   
Second Opinion

Scientists aim to 'see' invisible transmission of coronavirus

Some researchers aim to learn more about how the coronavirus is transmitted by trying to make invisible sneezes, coughs and breaths more visible. Here's a closer look at that research and what it might reveal.

How hospitals will tackle the backlog of nearly 100,000 surgeries delayed by the pandemic

Flattening the COVID-19 infection curve, securing funding to pay for overtime, and finding a consistent supply of personal protective equipment and COVID-19 tests for every patient are all requirements for surgeries to ramp up again, the surgeon-in-chief at one of Canada's largest hospitals says.
THE DOSE

How to help seniors get through the COVID-19 pandemic

From questions to ask a long-term care facility to some advice on minimizing loneliness, here are some key things to consider when thinking about the impact COVID-19 is having Canada's elderly.
THE DOSE

COVID-19: The latest guidance for Canadians on travel, quarantines and what to do if you have symptoms

As Canada faces a rising number of coronavirus cases, public health experts and the public alike are dealing with confusion and uncertainty as the situation changes daily. Here are some answers — and key questions experts are still working on.
THE DOSE

As Canadians hope for coronavirus vaccine, many aren't getting immunized against other diseases

As scientists race to develop a vaccine to combat the coronavirus epidemic, many Canadian adults aren't getting taking advantage of vaccinations that are already available to protect them against other serious illnesses, public health experts say.
THE DOSE

Why a top Canadian obesity expert doesn't use BMI

Charts showing body mass index have been posted in doctors' offices for decades, but experts caution against using the number to make assumptions about an individual's health.
CBC Explains

'This is not a magic wand': Spinal stimulation used on Humboldt Bronco promising but in early research stages

Spinal cord injury survivors and researchers say patients are anxiously waiting for a cure, but the safety and effectiveness of electrical stimulation therapies still need to be proven.

As election campaigns hustle to get out the vote, homeless voters are often forgotten

Not having ID, feeling unwelcome in polling stations and having limited access to candidates are barriers standing between homeless people and the ballot box — but there are solutions, experts say.

Breast cancer risk in menopausal hormone therapy linked to type and length of treatment, study says

New findings published in the Lancet medical journal say the risk of breast cancer associated with menopausal hormone therapy is higher than previously thought, but doctors say women need to weigh the risk against the severity of menopause symptoms.

World Health Organization applauds Pinterest's 'leadership' in fighting vaccine misinformation

Social media platform previously removed all vaccine-related content to protect users from misinformation and is now allowing posts only from 'reliable' health sources.

Why some experts say it's time for Twitter and Facebook to ban anti-vaccination posts

As measles cases continue to rise in Canada and the U.S., experts are calling on social media platforms to ban anti-vaccination posts, saying the risks to public health created by misinformation outweigh the right to free speech.

Doctors worry as anti-vaccination messages escalate from social media misinformation to personal threats

As anti-vaccination groups fight back against public health campaigns to promote immunization in the face of measles outbreaks, some Canadian doctors say the battle has escalated beyond social media platforms to personal threats and attacks.

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