Nicole Ireland

Nicole Ireland is a CBC News journalist with a special interest in health and social justice stories. Based in Toronto, she has lived and worked in Thunder Bay, Ont.; Iqaluit, Nunavut; and Beirut, Lebanon.

Latest from Nicole Ireland

Why some experts say it's time for Twitter and Facebook to ban anti-vaccination posts

As measles cases continue to rise in Canada and the U.S., experts are calling on social media platforms to ban anti-vaccination posts, saying the risks to public health created by misinformation outweigh the right to free speech.

Doctors worry as anti-vaccination messages escalate from social media misinformation to personal threats

As anti-vaccination groups fight back against public health campaigns to promote immunization in the face of measles outbreaks, some Canadian doctors say the battle has escalated beyond social media platforms to personal threats and attacks.

Coyote co-existence policies mean pets are never safe, group of homeowners say

As coyotes increasingly take up residence in cities and towns across Canada, both provinces and municipalities have adopted "living with coyotes' policies. A group in Collingwood, Ont., is demanding action, saying governments are failing to protect their pets.

Notre-Dame fire: What's been lost, what's been saved and where there's hope

Firefighters managed to save much of the famous Paris cathedral's structure, beloved organ and religious artifacts, but the fate of many historic sculptures and stained glass windows is still unclear.

Stronger action urged against homeopathic products touted as alternatives to vaccines

Health Canada's recent warning that homeopathic remedies are not an alternative to vaccines doesn't go far enough to prevent the damage the products could do as the country fights off a resurgence of measles, doctors and health policy experts say. 

Facebook announces plan to 'tackle vaccine misinformation'

In the midst of measles outbreaks and growing calls from health experts to stem the tide of misinformation about vaccines, Facebook announced on Thursday that it would reduce the visibility of anti-vaccination posts and reject ads that include such content.

Pharmacare advisory council calls for national drug agency, but no guidance yet on universal coverage

An interim report released by the Liberal government's pharmacare advisory council didn't answer some key questions, but health and finance ministers deny it was a tactic to distract from the SNC-Lavalin controversy.

'It's a war around the truth': Health experts, Facebook and YouTube play catch-up with anti-vaxxers

Public health authorities have assumed, incorrectly, that simply presenting medical facts would be enough to counter anti-vaccination misinformation, experts say.

Children are bearing the brunt of this year's flu season, health officials say

Many Canadian children are spending the holidays battling the flu and other respiratory illnesses — and an early start to the flu season might be partly to blame, public health officials say. Doctors say it's not too late to get the flu shot, which they expect to be more effective than last year.

Children are bearing the brunt of this year's flu season, health officials say

Many Canadian children are spending the holidays battling the flu and other respiratory illnesses — and an early start to the flu season might be partly to blame, public health officials say. Doctors say it's not too late to get the flu shot, which they expect to be more effective than last year.

'Unprecedented' drug shortages affecting many Canadians, new survey suggests

One in four people surveyed say they have either experienced a shortage of their medication, or know someone who has, as Canada grapples with a "dire" problem.

Don't use rapid tests to rule out strep throat, many pharmacists directed

In Nova Scotia — one of the three provinces where in-pharmacy strep tests are available — the College of Pharmacists says it agrees with infectious disease specialists that the rapid tests shouldn't be used to diagnose strep throat, especially in children.

3 more cases of E. coli illness from romaine lettuce confirmed in Canada

Unlike U.S. public health officials, who continue to warn all Americans not to eat romaine lettuce, the Public Health Agency of Canada is targeting its advisory only to Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, where E. coli cases have been confirmed.

New Brunswick joins provinces affected by E. coli linked to romaine lettuce

The E. coli strain currently suspected of making people sick in both Canada and the U.S. is the same that caused a similar outbreak last year, prompting questions about why regulators aren't issuing a mandatory recall.
SECOND OPINION

Pediatricians call for ban on flavoured vaping products — but Health Canada isn't going there

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is restricting sales of most e-cigarette flavours to areas of stores where people under age 18 aren't allowed to enter. Canada is not adopting those same restrictions.