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PHOTOS | World Nomad Games on in Kyrgyzstan

Eagle hunting, wrestling and the spectacular (and violent) horseback game kok-boru headline the second annual World Nomad Games being held on the shores of Issyk Kul lake in Kyrgystan.

2nd annual spectacle of traditional sports runs Sept. 3-8

(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)

Games are billed as 'Eurasia's Olympics.'

Eagle hunting, wrestling and the spectacular (and violent) horseback game kok-boru headline the second annual World Nomad Games being held on the shores of Issyk Kul lake in Kyrgyzstan.

(Vladimir Voronin/Associated Press)

40 countries, including the U.S., are participating.

Teams from Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Turkmenistsan and Tajikistan are considered favourites when it comes to winning the events, but Russia, U.A.E., Italy, Pakistan, India and Madagascar are also represented.

(Vladimir Voronin/Associated Press)

Kok-boru is the main event.

The contact sport involves teams of mounted players focused on dunking a goat carcass into pool-shaped goal. Punches get thrown and injuries are not uncommon when the dust settles. Here's an American team member going head-to-head with a Kazakh opponent.

(Vladimir Voronin/Associated Press)
(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)

Wrestling is another big ticket event.

There are several types of wrestling being contested at the Nomad Games, including arm wrestling.

(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)

Traditional arts and culture are also on display.

Traditional dances and historical reenactments, like this melee, are also a facet of the Games.

(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)
(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)

The opening ceremony featured flaming performers.

(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)

There were also fireworks.

(Igor Kovalenko/EPA)

Steven Seagal was the guest of honour.

The action film star was at the opening ceremony dressed as a traditional Kyrgyz warrior. The American actor has Russian roots and has been photographed with President Vladimir Putin, with whom he shares a love of martial arts.

(Vladimir Voronin/Associated Press)

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