News·Audio

Me, myself, and han

Eunice Kim was born in South Korea and she speaks the language fluently, but recently, she stumbled upon an unfamiliar word: han. Han has no English translation. It's used to describe a combination of rage, grief and regret - a feeling so powerful, some believe you can die from it. To many Koreans, han is part of the cultural DNA. Once you know what it is, you see it everywhere, from Korean movies to the unofficial national anthem. So, how exactly did it escape Eunice? Why did her family never mention it? Eunice turns to her grandmother, her mother, and her father to ask them about han. Have they had it all this time? And is it possible that she's inherited something she never even knew existed?
Eunice Kim was born in South Korea and she speaks the language fluently, but recently, she stumbled upon an unfamiliar word: han. Han has no English translation. It's used to describe a combination of rage, grief and regret - a feeling so powerful, some believe you can die from it. To many Koreans, han is part of the cultural DNA. Once you know what it is, you see it everywhere, from Korean movies to the unofficial national anthem. So, how exactly did it escape Eunice? Why did her family never mention it? Eunice turns to her grandmother, her mother, and her father to ask them about han. Have they had it all this time? And is it possible that she's inherited something she never even knew existed? 27:30