Laura Wright

Laura Wright is an online reporter and editor for CBC News in Toronto. She previously worked for CBC North in Yellowknife.

Latest from Laura Wright

Origins of 'hobbit' species discovered

Scientists have discovered the origins of a short, ancient species nicknamed 'hobbits' due to their small stature, putting to rest several other hotly debated theories about the species.

Ocean 'conveyor belt' brings billions of plastic particles into Arctic waters

An ocean current is acting as a kind of conveyor belt leading billions of bits of plastic to a dead end in the Arctic, according to new research published in the journal Science Advances.
CBC Investigates

Canadians not terribly savvy about digital privacy, poll finds

As part of the Police, Power and Privacy series, CBC News found that most Canadians haven't used tools like encryption or virtual private networks to safeguard their security and privacy online.

Researchers uncover structure of marijuana receptor that makes humans 'high'

Researchers have the clearest-ever picture of the receptor that gives humans the 'high' from marijuana, which could lead to a better understanding of how the drug affects humans.

'Hello, Future': 2 spacecraft, a rocket and a probe blasted off to space

Space usually seems infinitely vast, but it's feeling a little crowded these days — two different crewed missions and two uncrewed missions have just blasted off for their various projects exploring the cosmos.

Bad wiring or bad chemistry? What's behind Samsung's exploding smartphone batteries?

The batteries in the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones are the same kind that's used safely in millions of wireless devices around the world.

Naked mole rats have evolved to feel pain differently than humans, mice

Small, hairless, virtually blind and living in crowded underground tunnels serving a queen — naked mole rats' lives may sound unpleasant, but they’ve got a leg up on humans (and rats and mice): what hurts us doesn’t bother the humble mole rat at all.

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter block social media tool Geofeedia over protest surveillance

The American Civil Liberties Union is sounding the alarm on how police monitor social media, particularly during protests, and the Canadian chapter has similar concerns.

Global carbon dioxide levels reach highest point ever, likely for good

Global carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have surpassed 400 parts per million, and will almost certainly remain there indefinitely, according to new numbers from the Scripps carbon dioxide monitoring program at the Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii.

Sugary treats make bumblebees 'happy,' say researchers

New research has found that bumblebees can have "emotion-like states," which suggests that insects may have more complex brains than previously thought.

Elon Musk reveals plan to get humans to Mars within 10 years

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk updated the world on his ambitious plans to get humans to Mars within the next 10 years, something he said would insure the human race against some kind of doomsday event, which he said is likely inevitable at some point in the distant future.

Got a few million to spare? Here are the companies vying to send tourists to space

Travel to the final frontier is becoming increasingly accessible as the race to send tourists to space is heating up. For a hefty price tag, companies are offering trips to the International Space Station, and travel 100 kilometres above Earth.

'Shady, secretive system': Public Safety green-lit RCMP, CSIS spying devices, documents reveal

Public Safety Canada has repeatedly approved CSIS and the RCMP’s use of devices to spy on Canadians' communications, documents obtained by CBC News reveal.

Canadian tech company Netsweeper helped Bahrain censor websites, says report

Canadian technology company Netsweeper helped the Bahraini government to block opposition party websites, news websites and content critical of Islam, according to a new report.

Larger marine animals more likely to go extinct, and humans probably to blame, says study

The larger the marine animal, the more chance it has of coming under threat of extinction — and humans are likely to blame, according to a study to be published Friday in the journal Science.