Indigenous

'Don't want my daughter to be another statistic,' says Mi'kmaw father pleading for her safe return

A Mi'kmaw father says he has barely slept since his 24-year-old daughter went missing. Marley Morris was last seen Feb. 18 in Dartmouth, a community within the Halifax Regional Municipality.

Marley Morris was last seen Feb. 18 in the community of Dartmouth in Halifax Regional Municipality

Marley Morris is described as five feet eight inches tall and 200 pounds, and was last seen in downtown Dartmouth, a community in the Halifax Regional Municipality. (Submitted by Fabian Francis )

A Mi'kmaw father says he has barely slept since his 24-year-old daughter went missing more than two weeks ago.

Marley Alicia Morris was last seen in downtown Dartmouth, a community within the Halifax Regional Municipality, on Feb. 18, according to Halifax Regional Police.

Her father, Fabian Francis, said he knew something was wrong when Morris missed her son's birthday. The boy turned five on Feb. 21.

"She never forgets to wish her son a happy birthday, so that was a big red flag," said Francis. 

Countless 'what if' scenarios

Francis says he's running through countless 'what if' scenarios and just wants her to come home. 

"We all miss her and we're hoping for her safe return soon," said Francis, from Eskasoni First Nation. 

Fabian Francis, left, and his daughter Marley Morris, who is currently missing. Francis says he grew concerned when Marley didn't call to wish her son a happy fifth birthday. (Submitted by Fabian Francis )

Morris is described as five feet eight inches tall and about 200 pounds. Halifax police said in an emailed statement there's no evidence to suggest foul play, but they are concerned for her well-being. 

Francis says his daughter is funny, loving, and very caring and has dreams of becoming a nurse. He says the entire family is stressed, and doing a lot of praying and smudging. 

Francis says his home community of Eskasoni First Nation is doing a lot to support them.

Morris has ties to Eskasoni First Nation, and that community is making a public plea to share her missing person poster. (Submitted by Fabian Francis )

Chief Leroy Denny, Eskasoni's chief, says a team was sent to Halifax to be with the family, help canvas the community and hang up missing-person posters. Denny said he's reached out to all the chiefs he knows across the country to stay vigilant in case someone spots Morris. 

"We'll do whatever we can and we're just here to help," said Denny.

He said the community knows too well the stories of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and that some families still don't have answers.

'I just don't want my daughter to be another statistic'

Morris is Denny's niece and he's hoping for a different outcome. He said the public can help by sharing her photos and posters.

Police ask that Morris, or anyone with information on her whereabouts, to contact 902-490-5020. Anonymous tips can be sent to Crime Stoppers by calling toll-free 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or submit a secure web tip at www.crimestoppers.ns.ca or by using the P3 Tips app. 

"I just don't want my daughter to be another statistic," said Francis.

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