Indigenous

COVID-19 in Indigenous communities: What you need to know

The number of active cases of COVID-19 in First Nations communities continues to rise as the delta variant-driven fourth wave of the pandemic progresses.

Active cases of the virus continue to rise, majority reported in Saskatchewan and Alberta

Health care workers administer COVID-19 vaccinations to members of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation in B.C. in March. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

The number of active cases of COVID-19 in First Nations communities continues to rise as the delta variant-driven fourth wave of the pandemic progresses.

As of Sept. 7, there were 1,580 active cases of the virus in First Nations across the country, according to the latest data from Indigenous Services Canada. 

The majority of new infections were reported in Saskatchewan and Alberta. In Alberta, the cumulative total confirmed cases on First Nations has surpassed 10,000.

Since the pandemic began, there have been 36,594 cases in First Nations communities. Total hospitalizations have increased to 1,722 and 399 First Nations people living on-reserve have died from the virus, with five deaths reported in the last week. 

Total cases in First Nations communities per region reported as of Sept. 7

  • British Columbia: 3,720
  • Alberta: 10,182
  • Saskatchewan: 9,371
  • Manitoba: 9,354
  • Ontario: 3,040
  • Quebec: 892
  • Atlantic: 27

Vaccine rates

As of Aug. 31, a total of 748,209 vaccine doses have been administered to individuals aged 12 and older in 687 First Nations, Inuit, and territorial communities, as well as 330,197 second doses.

Pandemic stories:

WATCH: Roxanne Tootoosis, known for keeping Cree traditions alive for the next generation, has died due to complications from the delta variant of COVID-19:

Edmonton elder and knowledge keeper dies of COVID-19

1 year ago
Duration 1:51
Roxanne Tootoosis, known for keeping Cree traditions alive for the next generation, has died due to complications from the delta variant of COVID-19.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19? 

  • New or worsening cough.
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.
  • Temperature equal to or over 38 C.
  • Feeling feverish.
  • Chills.
  • Fatigue or weakness.
  • Muscle or body aches.
  • New loss of smell or taste.
  • Headache.
  • Abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting.
  • Feeling very unwell.

If you think you might have COVID-19, please consult your local health department to book an appointment at a screening clinic.

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