Indigenous

COVID-19 in Indigenous communities: What you need to know

Over 52 per cent of people aged 12 and up in First Nations and Inuit communities are now fully vaccinated, according to the latest data from Indigenous Services Canada.

635,242 vaccine doses administered to date in First Nations and Inuit communities

Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation nurse Brandy Strong administers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. (Francine Compton/CBC)

Over 52 per cent of people aged 12 and up in First Nations and Inuit communities are now fully vaccinated, according to the most recent data from Indigenous Services Canada.

At least 79 per cent of that population has received at least one dose, based on Statistics Canada population projections. As of July 2, a total of 635,242 vaccine doses had been administered to individuals aged 12 and older in 687 First Nations and Inuit communities. The number includes 254,250 second doses.

As of July 5, there were 455 active cases of the virus in First Nations. The majority of new infections have been reported in Saskatchewan and Ontario.

Since the pandemic began, there have been a total of 32,290 cases in First Nations communities. A total of 362 First Nations people living on-reserve have died from the virus, with two deaths reported since last week.

Total hospitalizations has climbed to 1,541, and the number of First Nations people who have recovered from the disease is now at 31,473.

Total cases in First Nations communities per region reported as of July 5:

  • British Columbia: 3,159
  • Alberta: 8,941
  • Saskatchewan: 7,696
  • Manitoba: 8,896
  • Ontario: 2,833
  • Quebec: 743
  • Atlantic: 22

Pandemic stories:

Watch Dr. Marcia Anderson discuss new data suggesting basing vaccination on age rather than other risk factors likely contributed to more severe COVID-19 outcomes among people of colour in Manitoba:

Dr. Marcia Anderson shares key takeaways from new data on impact of COVID-19 on BIPOC peoples

1 year ago
Duration 1:49
Dr. Marcia Anderson, public health lead for the First Nations pandemic response co-​ordination team, highlights some of the conclusions from newly released data on the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on BIPOC peoples in Manitoba.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19? 

  • New or worsening cough.
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.
  • Temperature equal to or over 38 C.
  • Feeling feverish.
  • Chills.
  • Fatigue or weakness.
  • Muscle or body aches.
  • New loss of smell or taste.
  • Headache.
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting).
  • Feeling very unwell.

If you think you may have COVID-19, please consult your local health department to book an appointment at a screening clinic. 

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