Health

Zika outbreak: Miami teams increase mosquito control efforts at stadiums

The Miami Dolphins and Miami Marlins say they've intensified mosquito-control treatments at their stadiums because of the Zika virus.

Treatments at Dolphins stadium site follow recommendations by U.S. CDC

Miami-Dade mosquito control inspector Yasser "Jazz" Compagines sprays a chemical mist into a storm drain on Tuesday in Miami Beach, Fla. (Alan Diaz/Associated Press)
The Miami Dolphins and Miami Marlins say they've intensified mosquito-control treatments at their stadiums because of the Zika virus.

The Dolphins' stadium is more than 10 miles (16 kilometers) from the nearest area of the virus outbreak. Even so, the Dolphins say they decided weeks ago to undertake additional treatments as a precaution.

Construction workers are at the site daily completing the latest phase in a $500 million US renovation. The first home preseason game is next Thursday against Tennessee.

The Marlins and Miami-Dade County have stepped up spraying in and around Marlins Park "in an abundance of caution," team president David Samson said Thursday. Treatments targeting the mosquito that transmits Zika are being used even though the Marlins play most of their home games indoors under a retractable roof.

Marlins Park is about 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) from the nearest area of virus outbreak.

Treatments at the Dolphins stadium site include the parking lot and follow recommendations by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention using chemicals approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Those treatments are expected to continue through the football season and beyond.

Backpack foggers will be used every two weeks, with treatments timed for a few days before games. The Dolphins' pest control provider also has removed standing water and treated larvae.

Zika causes a mild illness in most people but can lead to severe brain-related birth defects if women are infected during pregnancy.

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