Health

UN atlas ties climate change to spread of disease

The two UN agencies for health and weather services have created a new "atlas" of scientific data that they say offers fresh evidence of the links between climate change to outbreaks of meningitis, malaria and other diseases.

80% of infectious diseases found in humans come from animals, WHO head says

The two UN agencies for health and weather services have created a new "atlas" of scientific data that they say offers fresh evidence of the links between climate change to outbreaks of meningitis, malaria and other diseases.

The World Health Organization director-general says the manual, which includes maps, tables and graphs, provides a practical guide to "climate-sensitive diseases" that decision-makers and leaders can use as a tool for prevention.

Malaria, dengue and malnutrition are sensitive to climate and are expected to worsen as the climate changes, the World Health Organization says. (Katrina Manson/Reuters)

Dr. Margaret Chan told reporters Monday in Geneva that 80 per cent of the infectious diseases currently found in humans have come from animals — and the scientific research for managing disease in ecosystems has been "underutilized."

World Meteorological Association Secretary-General Michel Jarraud says the atlas is meant to spread information buried in the agencies' technical documents.