Health

Obama says memory of daughter's preschool asthma attacks spurs climate change debate

U.S. President Barack Obama says his memory of the fear over his daughter's preschool asthma attacks brings home the debate over climate change.

Preventing climate change could improve public health by reducing illnesses such as asthma, Obama says

U.S. President Barack Obama says his memory of the fear over his daughter's preschool asthma attacks brings home the debate over climate change.

Obama says he knows firsthand how scary it can be to have a child who struggles to breathe. He is arguing that preventing climate change could improve public health by reducing illnesses such as asthma.

Obama tells ABC he felt "terrible" fright when a young Malia told him she couldn't breathe and had to be rushed to the emergency room. He says he thinks every parent would wish to reduce such incidents by improving the environment.

Malia, now 16, has not had to carry an inhaler since before the family moved to the White House. But Obama tells CBS she still has allergies that need to be monitored.

On Tuesday, Obama announced commitments from Google, Microsoft and others to help the U.S. health system
prepare for a warmer, more erratic climate.

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