Health

Doctor-assisted suicide views to be raised at CMA annual meeting

Doctors continue to be divided about providing physician-assisted death, according to a report from the Canadian Medical Association.

Lifting of ban on physician-assisted death scheduled to take effect in February 2016

Doctors continue to be divided about providing physician-assisted death, according to a report from the Canadian Medical Association.

The CMA released the summary results of a consultation with its members to inform the group's annual meeting in Halifax next week.

Reconciling a doctor's right not to participate in assisted dying while ensuring access to the service for eligible patients remains contentious. (Shaun Best/Reuters) (Reuters)

Next February, the unanimous Supreme Court of Canada decision that overturned the ban on physician-assisted death is scheduled to take effect. 

Reconciling a doctor's right not to participate in assisted dying while ensuring access to the service for eligible patients was the most discussed issue in CMA's online dialogue, the group said.

The CMA's report from its June 8-July 20 consultation includes 545 comments posted by 595 members on key issues surrounding assisted dying, such as responding to a request for assisted dying, oversight and clinical requirements.

At the meeting, CMA plans to seek input from delegates about referrals from conscientious objectors.

The federal government and Ontario government both have panels studying physician-assisted dying.

Parliament could pass a new law against helping a competent adult with a grievous and irremediable medical condition to end his or her own life.

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