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Prince Harry says he and Meghan will have 2 kids 'maximum,' citing environmental concerns

In an interview with primatologist Jane Goodall for British Vogue, Prince Harry said becoming a father in May had changed his perspective on having more children due to environmental concerns.

Harry said becoming a father in May changed his perspective

Prince Harry says he and wife Meghan will have no more than two children because of concerns for the environment. Harry interviewed primatologist Jane Goodall for Vogue magazine, and said becoming a father to baby Archie in May had changed his perspective. (Dominic Lipinski/The Associated Press)

Prince Harry says he and his wife Meghan will have no more than two children because of concerns for the environment.

In an interview with primatologist Jane Goodall for British Vogue, Harry said becoming a father in May had changed his perspective.

He said, "I view it differently now, without question. But I've always wanted to try and ensure that, even before having a child and hoping to have children," Harry said before Goodall interjected: "Not too many!"

Harry replied: "Two, maximum! But I've always thought: this place is borrowed. And, surely, being as intelligent as we all are, or as evolved as we all are supposed to be, we should be able to leave something better behind for the next generation."

Harry interviewed Goodall for the September issue of British Vogue, which was guest-edited by Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex.

He said destruction of the environment was "terrifying," adding: "We are already living in it. We are the frog in the water and it's already been brought to the boil."

'Unconscious' racism bias

The discussion between Harry and Goodall also included the impact of upbringing and environment on people's views.

"Despite the fact that if you go up to someone and say, 'What you've just said, or the way that you've behaved, is racist' – they'll turn around and say, 'I'm not a racist'," Harry said.

"I'm not saying that you're a racist, I'm just saying that your unconscious bias is proving that, because of the way that you've been brought up, the environment you've been brought up in, suggests that you have this point of view – unconscious point of view – where naturally you will look at someone in a different way."

Harry, 34, has previously criticized some racist overtones in media coverage of his wife, a 37-year-old former actress whose mother is black and father is white.

In the article, Harry and Goodall agreed that children had to be taught to hate.

"But again, just as stigma is handed down from generation to generation, your perspective on the world and on life and on people is something that is taught to you," said Harry.

"It's learned from your family, learned from the older generation, or from advertising, from your environment."

With files from Reuters

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