Entertainment

Bob Odenkirk back filming Better Call Saul after 'small heart attack'

Bob Odenkirk on Wednesday tweeted a photo of himself getting made up to play title character Saul Goodman in the AMC series Better Call Saul, indicating that shooting had resumed on its sixth and final season. 

Actor collapsed on set while filming AMC series in July

This image released by AMC shows Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill in a scene from Better Call Saul. On Wednesday, Odenkirk shared that he is back to filming after suffering a 'small heart attack' in July. (Greg Lewis/AMC/Sony Pictures Television/The Associated Press)

Bob Odenkirk is back shooting Better Call Saul, six weeks after having a heart attack. 

Odenkirk on Wednesday tweeted a photo of himself getting made up to play title character Saul Goodman in the AMC series, indicating that shooting had resumed on its sixth and final season. 

"Back to work on Better Call Saul!" Odenkirk said. "So happy to be here and living this specific life surrounded by such good people. BTW this is makeup pro Cheri Montesanto making me not ugly for shooting!" 

The update comes after Odenkirk, 58, suffered what he called a "small heart attack" on set while filming Season 6 of Saul in New Mexico in July.

He tweeted an update days later, thanking fans for the "outpouring of love." 

"I'm going to take a beat to recover but I'll be back soon," he wrote.

Odenkirk has been nominated for four Emmys for playing luckless lawyer Jimmy McGill, who becomes increasingly corrupt and adopts the pseudonym Saul Goodman, the "criminal lawyer" who appeared in dozens of episodes of Breaking Bad before getting his own spin-off.

Both shows were shot in, and mostly set in, New Mexico.

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