Entertainment

Marvin Gaye family attempts to block distribution of Blurred Lines

Marvin Gaye's children filed an injunction in court Tuesday to prevent the copying, distributing and performing of the hit song featuring Pharrell, Robin Thicke and T.I.

Heirs want to stop the copying, distributing and performing of hit by Pharrell and Robin Thicke

Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams (not pictured) were ordered to pay nearly $7.4 million US to Marvin Gaye's family who said Blurred Lines infringed the copyright of their father's song. Now they're fighting to prevent the copying, distributing and performing of the hit song. (Paul Morigi/Canadian Press/Invision)

Marvin Gaye's family wants to put a stop to Blurred Lines.

Gaye's children filed an injunction in court Tuesday to prevent the copying, distributing and performing of the hit song featuring Pharrell, Robin Thicke and T.I.

Marvin Gaye's daughter, Nona Gaye, left, and his ex-wife, Janis Hunter. The injunction against Blurred Lines could give them leverage to negotiate for royalties and other concessions. (Nick Ut/The Associated Press)
​Pharrell and Thicke were ordered to pay nearly $7.4 million US to three of Gaye's children after a jury determined last week that the performers copied elements of the R&B icon's 1977 hit Got to Give It Up.

Gaye's family also sought Tuesday to amend the verdict to include rapper T.I., whose real name is Clifford Joseph Harris Jr., as well as labels Universal Music, Interscope Records and Star Trak Entertainment.

The injunction against Blurred Lines could give Gaye's family leverage to negotiate for royalties and other concessions, such as songwriting credits.

"With the digital age upon us, the threat of greater infringement looms for every artist," the family said in a statement released Wednesday. "It is our wish that our dad's legacy, and all great music, past, present, and future, be enjoyed and protected, with the knowledge that adhering to copyright standards assures our musical treasures will always be valued."

Pharrell Williams leaves Los Angeles Federal Court after testifying at trial in Los Angeles. (Nick Ut/The Associated Press)
Blurred Lines was the biggest hit of 2013. It sold more than 7 million tracks in the United States, topped the pop charts for months and earned two Grammy Award nominations.

A lawyer representing Thicke and Williams has indicated that the artists plan to appeal the verdict.

With files from CBC News

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