Entertainment

Madonna defends anti-Trump speech at women's march

Madonna is defending her fiery, expletive-laden speech at the women's march, saying her words were "taken wildly out of context."

Singer criticized for 'blowing up the White House' statement

Madonna, seen in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, is defending her fiery, expletive-laden speech at the women's march, saying her words were 'taken wildly out of context.' (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

Madonna is defending her fiery, expletive-laden speech at the women's march, saying her words were "taken wildly out of context."

The singer said at the Washington, D.C., march Saturday that she had at times been angry after the election and had thought "an awful lot about blowing up the White House," but that it "wouldn't change anything."

Using explicit language onstage at times, Madonna said that "no opposing force stands a chance in the face of true solidarity."

Warning: explicit language in video

"Let's march together through this darkness and with each step know that we are not afraid," the singer said, also prompting the crowd to repeat after her in unison: "Yes, we are ready."

Cable news networks broadcasting her speech cut away after Madonna used several expletives.

MSNBC later apologized. 

In a statement Sunday on Instagram , Madonna said she was trying to express there are two ways to respond to Donald Trump's election: with hope or with outrage.

"I spoke in metaphor and I shared two ways of looking at things — one was to be hopeful, and one was to feel anger and outrage, which I have personally felt. However, I know that acting out of anger doesn't solve anything. And the only way to change things for the better is to do it with love," she wrote online.

Madonna wrote that she doesn't promote violence and people should listen to her speech "in its entirety rather than one phrase taken wildly out of context."

Scores of Hollywood A-listers turned up at women's marches in Washington, D.C., and other cities on Saturday — part of a global movement aimed at showing support for feminism, equality and human rights as U.S. President Donald Trump took over the White House.

With files from CBC News.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.