Entertainment

Justin Bieber cancels tour dates over continued health concerns

Justin Bieber has cancelled the remainder of his world tour over continued medical concerns, related to his struggle with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome.

'I need to make my health the priority right now,' singer shares on social media

A young man wearing a suit with a tattoo visible on his neck leans in toward the camera.
Justin Bieber arrives for the 2021 Met Gala on Sept. 13, 2021, in New York. The singer has cancelled his Justice World Tour over continued health problems. (Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images)

Justin Bieber is cancelling the remainder of his world tour due to ongoing medical issues, the singer shared in a statement to Instagram on Tuesday.

In June of this year, Bieber postponed a number of dates on his World Justice Tour after being diagnosed with  Ramsay Hunt Syndrome (RHS), just hours before taking the stage at Toronto's Scotiabank Arena.

At the time, Bieber's face was partially paralyzed from the illness. According to the U.S. National Organization for Rare Diseases, RHS is a "rare neurological disorder characterized by paralysis of the facial nerve (facial palsy) and a rash affecting the ear or mouth." 

In July, he announced the tour would continue. But in his Tuesday statement, Bieber shared that the physical and mental stress of performing still proved to be too much.

An Instagram post is visible. It reads: "Justin Bieber Justice World Tour Announcement: Earlier this year, I went public about my battle with Ramsay-Hunt Syndrome, where my face was partly paralyzed. As  the result of this illness, I was not able to complete the North America leg of the Justice Tour. After resting and consulting with my doctors, family and team, I went to Europe in an effort to continue with the tour. I performed six live shows, but it took a real toll on me. This past weekend, I performed at Rock in Rio and I gave everything I have to the people in Brazil. After getting off stage, the exhaustion overtook me and I realized that I need to make my health the priority right now. So I'm going to take a break from touring for the time being. I'm going to be ok, but I need time to rest and get better. I've been so proud to bring this show and our message of Justice to the world. Thank you for your prayers and support throughout all of this! I love you all passionately!"
Bieber posted this statement in an Instagram story on Tuesday, sharing that he is cancelling the remainder of his tour over continued health concerns. (Justin Bieber/Instagram)

"After resting and consulting with my doctors, family and team, I went to Europe in an effort to continue with the tour," he wrote. "I performed six live shows, but it took a real toll on me ... After getting off stage, the exhaustion overtook me and I realized that I need to make my health the priority right now."

Bieber said he planned to rest and recover, and stressed that he is "going to be OK."

The remainder of the Justice World Tour was scheduled to go on until March of 2023, with stops in 10 countries.

WATCH | Justin Bieber has RHS. Here's what that means:

What is Ramsay Hunt syndrome, the rare disorder affecting Justin Bieber?

4 months ago
Duration 4:53
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre neurologist Dr. Matthew Burke sheds some light on Ramsay Hunt syndrome, a rare disorder that popstar Justin Bieber disclosed he was dealing with after cancelling performances in Toronto.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jackson Weaver is a senior writer for CBC Entertainment News. You can reach him at jackson.weaver@cbc.ca, or follow him on Twitter at @jacksonwweaver

With files from CBC News

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now