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Jeff Koons' Rabbit fetches record $91M at auction

A stainless steel sculpture of a rabbit by Jeff Koons has set an auction record in New York, fetching over $91 million.

Stainless steel sculpture sets new record for sale of a work by a living artist

A man takes a picture of Rabbit by Jeff Koons during a preview at Christie's in New York earlier this month. The sculpture fetched more than $91 million US, making it the most expensive work by a living artist ever sold at auction. (Seth Wenig/Associated Press)

A stainless steel sculpture of a rabbit by Jeff Koons has set an auction record in New York, fetching over $91 million US.

The sale of Koons' 1986 Rabbit at Christie's Wednesday was the most expensive work by a living artist ever sold at auction.

The final price achieved includes the hammer price of $80 million plus auction house fees.

The previous record for a living artist's work sold at auction was set by British artist David Hockney. His 1972 Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures) brought in $90.3 million US at Christie's last year.

The New York Times says Robert E. Mnuchin, an art dealer and the father of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, was the winning bidder for Rabbit, which had an estimated sale price of at least $50 million US.

Christie's says the sculpture is one of three editions plus one artist's proof.

Jeff Koons, seen standing next to his sculpture Michael Jackson and Bubbles at Oslo's Astrup Fearnley Museum in 2018, is also known for pop culture-inspired artworks. (Lise Aserud/NTB Scanpix/Associated Press)

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