Entertainment

Game of Thrones finale 'an ending, but it was also a beginning:' George RR Martin

What's next for Game of Thrones? The author, whose work was adapted into the HBO series that drew a record-setting numbers of viewers for Sunday's finale, says it's 'been a wild ride.'

Author vows to finish long-awaited instalment The Winds of Winter

Following the series finale of HBO's Game of Thrones, writer George R. R. Martin called the TV phenomenon 'a wild ride, to say the least.' (Rich Polk/Getty Images for IMDb)

What's next for Game of Thrones?

Author George RR Martin, whose work was adapted into the HBO series that drew a record-setting numbers of viewers for Sunday's finale, says it's "been a wild ride."

According to numbers released by HBO, the series finale brought in 19.3 million viewers across its various platforms, topping the previous episode's 18.4 million, to make it the most-viewed episode of any kind in the channel's history.

Martin wrote on his blog Monday that it "was an ending, but it was also a beginning."

The 70-year-old says he's working on the next instalment, The Winds of Winter. He says he knows it's late, "but it will be done."

He's just not saying when. He added that A Dream of Spring will follow.

Martin noted that he hears people asking whether his series have the same ending as the show or will it be different.

"Well. yes. And no," Martin writes. 

Martin poses with and the cast and creators of Game of Thrones after winning the Emmy Award for outstanding drama series in Los Angeles in 2018. (Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images)

"I am working in a very different medium than [show creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss], never forget. They had six hours for this final season. I expect these last two books of mine will fill 3000 manuscript pages between them before I'm done… and if more pages and chapters and scenes are needed, I'll add them."

Martin rebuffed the notion of competition between the HBO show and his books over which would be the "real" ending, calling it a silly question.

"How about this?" he continued. "I'll write it. You read it. Then everyone can make up their own mind, and argue about it on the internet."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.