Entertainment

Clint Eastwood doesn't endorse Trump, but praises him as anti-PC

Clint Eastwood has stopped short of endorsing Donald Trump, but in an interview in Esquire magazine he praised the Republican presidential candidate for being 'on to something.'
Clint Eastwood, seen in June, has stopped short of endorsing Donald Trump, but in a new interview in Esquire magazine, he hailed the Republican presidential candidate as a foe of political correctness and lamented what he called 'the kiss-ass generation.' (Chris Pizzello/Invision/Associated Press)

Clint Eastwood has stopped short of endorsing Donald Trump, but in an interview in Esquire magazine he praised the Republican presidential candidate for being "on to something."

In the interview alongside his son, actor Scott Eastwood, posted online Wednesday, the actor-director hailed Trump as a foe of political correctness and lamented what he called "the kiss-ass generation."

"Everybody's walking on eggshells," said Eastwood, 86.

"We see people accusing people of being racist and all kinds of stuff. When I grew up, those things weren't called racist."

Eastwood, who spoke at the 2012 Republican convention — "that silly thing ... talking to the chair" — urged people to "get over it."

Clint Eastwood called his bizarre address at the 2012 Republican National Convention, in which he talked to an empty chair onstage, 'that silly thing.' (Joe Skipper/Reuters)

"What Trump is onto is he's just saying what's on his mind. And sometimes it's not so good. And sometimes it's... I mean, I can understand where he's coming from, but I don't always agree with it," he said.

Eastwood said he wasn't endorsing anyone for president. But asked to choose between Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton he said, "I'd have to go for Trump... you know, 'cause she's declared that she's gonna follow in Obama's footsteps. There's been just too much funny business on both sides of the aisle."

Eastwood's film Sully — about Captain Chesley (Sully) Sullenberger, the airline pilot who became a national hero when he safely landed a US Airways plane on the Hudson River off Manhattan in 2009 — opens in September.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.