Entertainment

'Dress Like a Woman' hashtag takes off after alleged Trump dress code

The hashtag #DressLikeAWoman has caused a firestorm on social media after claims surfaced that U.S. President Donald Trump likes female staffers "to dress like women."

Oscar-winner Brie Larson among those responding to source saying female staffers must 'dress like women'

This photo, posted by California senator Kamala Harris on Twitter, is one of many that made their rounds under the hashtag #DressLikeAWoman following claims that Trump female staffers were instructed to 'dress like women.' (Twitter)

The hashtag #DressLikeAWoman took over social media Friday after claims surfaced that U.S. President Donald Trump likes female staffers "to dress like women."

The media website Axios, created by the co-founder of Politico, reported from a campaign source that appearances are important to Trump: "Even if you're in jeans, you need to look neat and orderly."

The article cites sources who say men are expected to wear a tie and be "sharply dressed" and that women are expected "to dress like women."

"We hear that women who worked in Trump's campaign field offices — folks who spend more time knocking on doors than attending glitzy events — felt pressure to wear dresses to impress Trump," wrote Mike Allen and Jonathan Swan, who published the article.

The reference to an alleged female dress code sparked outrage online and flurry of tweets.

People posted photos of women in uniforms, scrubs, space suits and even a shot of Game of Thrones' warrior Brienne of Tarth in response, pointing out the sexism behind the anonymous quote.

Academy Award-winner Brie Larson, who starred in the 2015 film Room and is set to take the lead in the upcoming movie Captain Marvel, posted along with a photo of herself: "Director/producer/writer/academy award winner in her office with a view. I'll dress how I damn well please thankyouverymuch."

Comedian Cameron Esposito also responded.

Here are some others, many of which were retweeted several times over, that drove the point home.

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