Donner Prize writers look at obesity, immigration

Books about Canada's skilled immigration policy, an examination of the obesity epidemic and a book that questions whether the prime minister wields too much power are competing for this year's Donner Prize.

Books about Canada's skilled immigration policy, an examination of the obesity epidemic and a book that questions whether the prime minister wields too much power are competing for this year's Donner Prize.

The short list for the $50,000 award, which recognizes the best book on public policy by a Canadian, was announced Tuesday by Allan Gotlieb, chairman of the Donner Canadian Foundation.

The nominees are:

  • Democratizing the Constitution: Reforming Responsible Government by Peter Aucoin, Mark D. Jarvis and Lori Turnbull (Emond Montgomery Publications).
  • Toward Improving Canada's Skilled Immigration Policy: An Evaluation Approach by Charles M. Beach, Alan G. Green and Christopher Worswick (C.D. Howe Institute).
  • Museum Pieces: Toward the Indigenization of Canadian Museums by Ruth B. Phillips (McGill-Queen's University Press).
  • XXL: Obesity and the Limits of Shame by Neil Seeman and Patrick Luciani (University of Toronto Centre for Public Management).

"This year our finalists tackle four very different, and very timely, policy issues and deliver fresh new insights and bold policy recommendations," Gotlieb said in press statement.

The short list was chosen from 58 submissions.

The winner is to be announced May 1 in Toronto. Each finalist receives $7,500.