Entertainment

Justin Bieber, Ed Sheeran join forces for duet I Don't Care

Less than two months after telling fans he was stepping back from new music to deal with personal issues, Canadian pop star Justin Bieber gave them something to cheer about on Friday, releasing a new song with British singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran.

Sheeran previously wrote Love Yourself for Bieber

Ed Sheeran, left, and Justin Bieber have released a duet called I Don't Care. (Getty Images)

Less than two months after telling fans he was stepping back from new music to deal with personal issues, Canadian pop star Justin Bieber gave them something to cheer about on Friday, releasing a new song with British singer/songwriter Ed Sheeran.

Sheeran has co-written a song for Bieber before, but their new single I Don't Care was the first the two chart-toppers have released as a duet.

Both singers, who each made news in the past year by getting married at secret weddings, had teased fans on social media this week about the track, in which they sing about feeling out of place at a party but finding support in someone close.

"Me and @justinbieber have got a new song out. It's called I Don't Care hope you like it," Sheeran wrote on his Instagram page.

Bieber offered a similar, but even shorter, Instagram post:: "Me and @teddysphotos. It's out now. I don't care."

In March, 25-year-old Bieber, a teenage heartthrob who shot to fame aged 15, told fans he was "focused on repairing some...deep rooted issues" and was putting new music on hold.

A month later, he surprised revelers at the Coachella music festival by joining singer Ariana Grande onstage for an unplanned performance of his hit single Sorry, after which he said a new album would come "soon."

Bieber's last album came out in 2015. Last year he collaborated with DJ Khaled and others on single No Brainer.

Sheeran's last album Divide, released in 2017 and featuring hit singles Shape of You and Perfect, topped charts around the world.

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