Entertainment

Amy Winehouse's family says documentary about singer's life is 'misleading'

The family of Amy Winehouse has criticized a documentary about the late singer that is due to have its premiere at next month's Cannes Film Festival.

Asif Kapadia's film Amy is due to screen next month at the Cannes Film Festival

British singer Amy Winehouse performs during the "Rock in Rio" music festival in Arganda del Rey, near Madrid, July 4, 2008. The family of the late singer has criticized a documentary about her life that is due to have its premiere at next month's Cannes Film Festival. (Juan Medina/Reuters)

The family of Amy Winehouse has criticized a documentary about the late singer that is due to have its premiere at next month's Cannes Film Festival.

A statement issued Sunday by family spokesman Chris Goodman said director Asif Kapadia's Amy is "misleading and contains some basic untruths."

The statement said the film suggested family members did too little to help the singer, who died in July 2011 at age 27 of accidental alcohol poisoning. The soul diva, whose 2006 album Back to Black won five Grammy Awards, had battled drug and alcohol abuse for years.

The family statement said the movie did not reflect the "huge effort from all concerned to help Amy at all stages."

"Fundamentally, the Winehouse family believes that the film does a disservice to individuals and families suffering from the complicated affliction of addiction," it said.

The filmmakers said in a statement that they began work with "total objectivity" and the support of the Winehouse family. They said the documentary was the result of interviews with about 100 people who knew the singer, including "friends, family, former partners and members of the music industry that worked with her."

Kapadia won wide acclaim with Senna, a documentary about the late motor racing champion Ayrton Senna.

Amy is due to screen out of competition at the May 13-24 Cannes festival.

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