Entertainment

Philip McKeon, Alice's son on hit sitcom, dead at 55

Philip McKeon, who as a child actor was featured as the son of Linda Lavin's Alice Hyatt in the 1980s CBS situation comedy Alice, has died in Texas at age 55, a family spokesperson said.

McKeon, on the hit show for a decade, worked in radio after he stopped acting

Philip McKeon is shown in an undated photo alongside his younger sister Nancy in a post last year from her Instagram account. (Nancy McKown/Instagram)

Philip McKeon, who as a child actor was featured as the son of Linda Lavin's Alice Hyatt in the 1980s CBS situation comedy Alice, has died in Texas at age 55, a family spokesperson said.

Spokesman Jeff Ballard said McKeon died Tuesday after a long illness. He said further details on where and how McKeon died were being withheld at his family's request.

McKeon acted in the role of Tommy Hyatt from 1976 to 1985 on Alice, which was a top 10 viewed show for four of those seasons, according to Nielsen. He also guested on TV shows The Love Boat, Fantasy Island and Amazing Stories, with his last acting credit in 1994, according to the Internet Movie Database.

Charlie Sheen, who co-starred in the Amazing Stories episode with McKeon, paid tribute.

"Over the past few decades, he was always a perfect gentleman and an ebullient spirit. And his goofy af smile, was pure gold," said Sheen.

Ballard said McKeon had worked for 10 years in the news department of a Los Angeles radio station before moving to Texas about five years ago to be better able to care for his family. He settled in the Central Texas Hill Country town of Wimberley, about 50 kilometres southwest of Austin, where he hosted a local radio show.

Survivors include his mother and Nancy McKeon, his sister best known for playing Jo Polniaczek in the 1980s NBC situation comedy The Facts of Life.

Kim Fields of The Facts of Life tweeted: "My heart is broken &aches for my sister Nancy who just lost her brother Phil. Pls cover her w/love & comforting grace."

With files from CBC News

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