World·Feature

Devastation: Haiti faces Hurricane Matthew's aftermath

Haiti is attempting to clean up after Hurricane Matthew made landfall Tuesday. The extent of the damage still difficult to gauge for poorest country in Western Hemisphere.

Extent of damage still difficult to gauge for poorest country in Western Hemisphere

More than 200 people have died and thousands have been displaced, mostly in southern Haiti, due to Hurricane Matthew

The impoverished island country is now working to clean up after after the storm made landfall on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016. These aerial views show the extent of damage in Jeremie. 

(Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)
(Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters) (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Homes have been destroyed.

It blew ashore around dawn on Tuesday. Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and a place where many people live in shacks of wood or concrete blocks. These residents are clearing a house destroyed by Hurricane Matthew in the southern city of Les Cayes.

(Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters)

"Our first response will concentrate on saving lives by providing safe water and hygiene kits to avoid the spread of cholera," Jean Claude Fignole, Oxfam's influence program director in Haiti, told Reuters. "Right now there are at least 10,000 people displaced from their homes and in need of safe shelter, water and food."

(Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters)

At least 11,000 people are living in shelters.

Mourad Wahba, the UN secretary general's deputy special representative for Haiti, called the hurricane's destruction the "largest humanitarian event" in Haiti since the devastating earthquake of January 2010. These Haitians have been living in the Juventud 2000 shelter since the 2010 earthquake.

(Edgard Garrido/Reuters)
(Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters)

Some streets are filled with garbage and human waste.

"The floods have been particularly damaging in the slum community of Cité Soleil. Sewage canals are overflowing and filling the streets with garbage and human waste," says Ravi Tripptrap, Malteser International Americas' executive director. "Makeshift shanty homes have been washed away. This is where our help is needed."

(Dieu Nalio Chery/Associated Press)
(Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

High waters threaten homes.

Surging waters ripped away a bridge in the flooded town of Petit Goave, preventing any road travel to the hard-hit southwest. Rescue workers in Haiti still struggle to reach cutoff towns and learn the full extent of the death and destruction caused by Hurricane Matthew.

(Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters) (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)
(Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

With files from Reuters

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