News

Corrections and clarifications

As part of a commitment to transparency, CBC News is publicly tracking significant corrections and clarifications to our reports.

CBC News is publicly tracking significant corrections and clarifications

CBC News is committed to transparency and accountability to our audience whenever we make an error or need to clarify a story. Until now, we noted any corrections or clarifications to online articles at the bottom of the story; TV or radio correctives were done on air on the relevant broadcast.

Effective Jan. 1, 2021, as part of this commitment to transparency, CBC News is also publicly tracking significant corrections or clarifications to our TV and radio news reports and online articles.

June 17, 2021

CBC News corrected this story, published on June 14, about the death of RCMP Const. Shelby Patton in Wolseley, Sask. Two people who claimed to have witnessed his death later admitted to fabricating their account. Those details were removed from the online story and the errors corrected on social channels, local radio programs and on The National. A story on the false account was also published.

June 6, 2021

An on-air clarification was broadcast on The World This Weekend regarding a story about the RCMP's difficulties in recruiting Indigenous officers. The World This Weekend incorrectly reported that recruitment efforts by the RCMP were complicated by the shooting deaths of Indigenous people, such as Chantel Moore, by the RCMP.  In fact, Moore was shot and killed by a member of the local police force in Edmundston, N.B.

May 13, 2021

CBC News corrected this story, published on May 5, about contractors of Irving Shipbuilding arriving from outside of Nova Scotia. The story contained factual inaccuracies and those errors were corrected online, on social channels, radio and TV when additional information was provided to CBC Nova Scotia.

April 30, 2021

We updated three stories that incorrectly described the AstraZeneca vaccine as 100 per cent effective in preventing the severe outcomes of COVID-19. In fact, the company says the vaccine has 100 per cent efficacy to prevent those outcomes. Effectiveness refers to outcomes in "the real world," while efficacy refers to outcomes in clinical trials. The corrected stories can be found herehere and here.

April 14, 2021

CBC News corrected this story, published on April 13, that said a patient hospitalized with COVID-19 had received two doses of the vaccine more than 14 days prior to the onset of symptoms. In fact, the second dose was received less than seven days prior to symptom onset and would not have been considered active yet. The headline was also changed to better reflect the overall information in the story.

March 31, 2021

CBC News has added a correction notice to an investigative documentary by The Fifth Estate called 13 Deadly Hours: the Nova Scotia Mass Shooting, available on The Fifth Estate website and on YouTube. The documentary said officers jumped out of a cruiser outside the Onslow fire hall and began firing. In fact, the person interviewed said it was not a cruiser and she believed it was a civilian vehicle. Since then, Nova Scotia's Serious Incident Response Team has found that it was an unmarked police vehicle.

March 22, 2021

We updated this story, first published on May 8, 2020, because the original article did not accurately clarify that the COVID-19 pandemic led to the changed visiting hours, and that the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre was following Ministry of Health guidelines that were updated due to the pandemic. The story has also been updated to add references to restrictions imposed by the Timmins and District Hospital, and to clarify that CBC Thunder Bay's research was based on a small random sampling of hospitals across Ontario and not a formal survey.

March 22, 2021

CBC News updated this story, originally published on April 23, 2020, which did not accurately reflect how the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre was planning for the pandemic. The story has been updated with exact wording from the 2017 Pandemic Influenza Plan. A previous version of this story also said patients with a poor prognosis being admitted to hospital would be left to die. In fact, that is not stated in the plan nor did CBC Thunder Bay practise due diligence in contacting the hospital for clarification on any aspect of the 92-page document. The story did not comply with CBC's Journalistic Standards and Practices.

March 18, 2021

We amended this story, posted on March 16, about the discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls to clarify where the scrolls were found.

March 16, 2021

On CBC Radio's The World This Hour, in a March 3 story regarding the International Criminal Court's decision to open up a war crimes investigation on Israel and Palestinians, we incorrectly reported that the court would investigate the Palestinians for the kidnap and murder of three Israeli soldiers in May 2014. In fact, the three Israelis were not soldiers and they were killed on June 12, 2014. That date is outside the scope of the court prosecutor's investigation, which is examining allegations since June 13, 2014.

March 16, 2021

We removed the content of this Associated Press story, published on Jan. 9, 2021, after AP said it had reported an erroneous account of a phone conversation between U.S. President Donald Trump and an investigative official from the state of Georgia about the U.S. election results. The corrected story is here.

March 5, 2021

We corrected this story, first posted on March 1, that said a police cadet was a witness to "the Taser death of Matthew Fosseneuve at the hands of police." In fact, while Fosseneuve died following an encounter with police during which he was Tasered, the Independent Investigation Unit of Manitoba said his death "resulted from pre-existing conditions to which no police action unlawfully contributed in any degree."

March 5, 2021

We removed the content of this story, originally published on April 30, 2020, regarding financial statements from the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre. It contained misleading information that had not been verified by CBC Thunder Bay prior to publication, as is required by our journalistic standards and practices.

March 1, 2021

We updated this story, first published on Feb. 26, to correct a statistic that said two per cent of those who identified themselves as Black or African American received doctorates in health sciences in 2017. In fact, the number is 9.5 per cent.

Feb. 19, 2021

An on-air correction was broadcast on News Network's Canada Tonight after the program incorrectly reported that Jean Augustine, elected in 1993, was the first Black MP in Canada. In fact, Augustine was the first female Black MP. Lincoln Alexander was the first Black MP, elected in 1968.

Feb. 12, 2021

We updated this article, first published on Feb. 11, that reported on plans by the Manitoba government to purchase a Canadian-made COVID-19 vaccine. We removed an epidemiologist's statements, which incorrectly compared two companies' vaccine trial processes.

Feb. 4, 2021

A story we first published on Jan. 19 has been updated to clarify that there are questions about Michelle Latimer's Indigenous identity claims, to better reflect Latimer's understanding of her identity, and to clarify some details of the suggested legislation. 

This story was also updated on Jan. 27 to clarify details about the kinds of awards and opportunities author Joseph Boyden has received.

Feb. 4, 2021

On a number of local radio programs on Jan. 21, in a segment about a call for federal legislation to authenticate Indigenous identity in Canada, we mistakenly referred to filmmaker Michelle Latimer as not Indigenous. We should have said her Indigenous identity claims are being questioned.

Jan. 25, 2021

An on-air clarification was broadcast on The National to acknowledge incorrect images of the Roberta Place Retirement Lodge in a story the previous evening regarding a COVID-19 outbreak at Roberta Place Long-Term Care. The retirement lodge is a separate building that did not have an outbreak at that time.

Jan. 17, 2021

An on-air clarification was broadcast on The World This Weekend to address some issues of balance regarding the vaccination process in Israel and the Palestinian Territories. You can listen to it here.

Jan. 11, 2021

We updated this story, first posted in November 2019, reporting on backlash to a Facebook post from Lethbridge Conservative MP Rachael Harder. Our update was to more accurately reflect her views and to better contextualize some of the reactions to her Facebook post.

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