Windsor

Yes, that's a car parked on a pedestrian bridge in Windsor

Photos of a car parked on a pedestrian bridge spanning Cabana Road in south Windsor are a stark reminder of why people should stay off the Herb Gray Parkway walking and biking trails, officials say.

Car is a reminder to public why it's not yet safe to be on Herb Gray Parkway trails

One of at least two photos posted to Facebook that show a Ministry of Transportation car parked on a pedestrian bridge. (Facebook)

Photos of a car parked on a pedestrian bridge spanning over Cabana Road in south Windsor are a stark reminder of why people should stay off the Herb Gray Parkway walking and biking trails, officials say.

Photos of a Ministry of Ontario vehicle parked high above Cabana Road surfaced on Facebook late Wednesday.

Several people on Facebook accused Windsorites of not knowing how to drive after photos of a car parked on a pedestrian bridge surfaced on social media. (Facebook)

Several on Facebook accused some Windsorites of not knowing how to drive, or suggesting the driver had taken a wrong turn at some point.

"I guess it technically is a bridge and there are pedestrians in the car smh," Facebook user Scott St. Denis posted late Wednesday when he shared the photo.

St. Denis told CBC through a Facebook message that he didn't take the photo, only shared it. It's not known who took the original photos that have been making the rounds on social media.

"I am pretty certain that the bridge was not designed to hold up cars!" Hank Dupuis replied.

Or is it?

"The bridge is designed to hold the weight. lol I actually drove a backhoe over one of them," Jeff Laframboise claimed in a Facebook reply. "But a car driven by lost tourist is just not OK. .. lol"

Mike Palanacki, of the Windsor Essex Mobility Group, which oversees the parkway has viewed the photos.

The white sedan is, indeed, an MTO vehicle, Palanacki confirmed to CBC. An inspector was working in the area, Palanacki said.

Trails along the nearly $2-billion highway are not yet opened. People who use them are trespassing.

Finishing touches are still being put on the trails and green space, Palanacki said. With cars, trucks and heavy equipment still deployed in the area, it's not safe for public use, Palanacki told CBC.

He also noted that even when the trails open, service vehicles will occasionally be on the pathways, servicing rest areas and emptying garbage, for example.

"Those service vehicles will, of course, have flashing lights," he said. "Until [the trails open], we just ask for the public's patience."

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