Windsor

Windsor's Muslim community celebrates Eid-ul-Adha

The massive prayer at Central Park Athletics drew an estimated 6,000 people, marking the day of sacrifice, explained Dr. Maher El-Masri, the chairperson of the Windsor Islamic Council.

Holiday commemorates the ending of pilgrimage to Mecca

More than 6,000 Muslims in Windsor celebrated Eid-ul-Adha at Central Park Athletics on Friday. (Dale Molnar/CBC)

Windsor's Muslim community, on Friday, celebrated Eid-ul-Adha, a major Islamic holiday that commemorates the ending of the pilgrimage to Mecca. 

The massive prayer at Central Park Athletics drew an estimated 6,000 people, marking the day of sacrifice, explained Dr. Maher El-Masri, the chairperson of the Windsor Islamic Council.

"It's awesome because I get to see my Muslim sisters and brothers in a large gathering and we get to connect," he said. 

Abdullah Alheidri celebrates Eid-ul-Adha on Friday, along with about 6,000 other Muslims. (Dale Molnar/CBC)

Abdullah Alheidri sees the holiday as a way for the Muslim community to come together as one larger family. 

"It's a time when we all gather together. It makes me happy to see my brothers happy. It's a good time to be with family, its' a good time to be with friends — it means everything." 

El-Masri described the holiday tradition as being similar to Christmas or Hanukah, where family and friends get together to feast and celebrate, while also paying particular attention to giving back to the community through donations to the less fortunate. 

The similarities between the religions demonstrate how much everyone has in common, he explained. 

"We're one," he said. "We might worship differently, ​we might look different, but at the same time, we are all humans."