Windsor pot shops raided: store owner says there was no warrant

An Ontario Provincial Police-led Cannabis Joint Forces Enforcement Team and Windsor Police Services laid six charges under the Cannabis Act in Windsor on Thursday. 

Compassion House owner Leo Lucier said it was a 'warrantless' search

(Stacey Janzer/CBC)

An Ontario Provincial Police-led Cannabis Joint Forces Enforcement Team and Windsor Police Services laid six charges under the Cannabis Act in Windsor on Thursday. 

One of those warrants was for Compassion House, located in the 400 block of Tecumseh Road West. Cash and illicit cannabis products were seized and two people were charged with possession for the purpose of selling.

"Call it what you want, they left some product here," said Compassion House owner Leo Lucier, calling it a "warrantless" search. He said no one was arrested and he was not one of the people charged. 

Lucier said no one went to jail and he was "looking around for a warrant" but that he wasn't there when officers came.

Compassion House had been closed after a raid in November 2018, but reopened after news of another cannabis sales company was operating downtown.

(Jason Viau/CBC)

That company, Envy, was also raided — but Lucier said they were operating again today. He doesn't know if he'll open again, but he's focused on cleaning up the "mess" left behind.

CBC could not reach anyone from Envy for comment. Four people were charged with possession with the intent to sell at that location.

Lucier said his company offers "life-saving medicine," including cannabis oils and that he has a business license to operate a compassion place for medical marijuana users to consume their products. According to Lucier, no one's told him that license is invalid.

"Until court comes to me and says Leo we're pulling your license, then we have a different scenario," said Lucier, adding that both local and provincial officials know his license to operate exists. "If there's something I'm doing wrong here, the courts should figure it out."

Lucier said he might pursue legal action against both the city and the province. 

"You put your time and money up and they come in and do what they want to do," said Lucier. "It's heartwrenching."