Windsor

Friendly Windsor-Detroit fireworks impacted by Canada-U.S. trade war

The annual fireworks display along the Detroit river has been an annual tradition for 60 years, but this time around the political climate between Canada and the U.S. has made it a bit different.

Political friction has caused some Americans to avoid coming to Canada to watch fireworks

Many Canadians and Americans enjoyed the annual Ford Fireworks along the Detroit River together in Windsor. (Jason Viau/CBC)

The fireworks display along the Detroit river has been an annual tradition for 60 years, but this time around the political climate between Canada and the U.S. has caused some people to feel a bit "nervous."

The is the first time these friendly fireworks, which took place Monday night, have exploded since the trade war between both countries began.

Colin McConnell lives in Detroit, Mich. and came to Windsor to watch the fireworks for the first time. He tried to recruit friends to come with him, but some were hesitant.

Colin McConnell lives in Detroit and came to Windsor to watch the fireworks show. He said some of his friends were too nervous to cross the border. (Jason Viau/CBC)

"Because of everything that's going on, they felt that it was something that they were a little nervous about," he said.

"If you say that you're from America, people instantly associate you with him," McConnell said, referring to U.S. President Donald Trump.

However, he said the relationship between Windsor and Detroit is different compared to how Trump talks about Canada.

"We get along so well and I think it's all about love and positivity," he said.

Lindsay Mcclure and her family came from Michigan to Windsor to watch the fireworks because it's more "peaceful." (Jason Viau/CBC)

Others brought their entire family over from Michigan to watch the fireworks on Canadian soil for a few reasons.

"The Canadian side; it's more peaceful, it's friendly on this side and they care about each other," said Lindsay Mcclure.

Despite Trump's perception on this side of the border or the political friction, many Canadians are watching with open arms.

Lisa Haidy is a Canadian who said everyone should put "politics aside" and just enjoy the fireworks. (Jason Viau/CBC)

Lisa Haidy is a Canadian and has pitched a tent at the river to watch the fireworks with her family for 24 years. She said Americans are always welcome.

"Put the politics aside, bring your family down and enjoy the fireworks. That's what that's about," Haidy said.

Canada's tariffs on U.S. goods for things like beer, whisky and even toilet paper come into effect July 1.

Did you miss Monday's fireworks show? Watch and relive it:

About the Author

Jason Viau is a video journalist, TV host and radio newsreader at CBC Windsor. He was born in North Bay, but has lived in Windsor for most of his life. Since graduating from St. Clair College, he's worked in print, TV and radio. Email him at jason.viau@cbc.ca

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