Windsor

New Windsor councillor to push the naloxone issue at next council meeting

Ward 9 councillor Kieran McKenzie will ask administration to develop a report "analyzing the issues and potential impacts of equipping first responders."

'If we could save a couple of lives that would be good': Coun. Kaschak

Local advocate Brandon Bailey carries a naloxone kit with him everywhere he goes, and says police officers across the country should do the same. (Dale Molnar/CBC)

Despite opposition from Windsor's police chief to having officers carry naloxone, the issue will be pushed at the Monday's meeting by a new councillor.

Ward 9 Councillor Kieran McKenzie will ask administration to develop a report "analyzing the issues and potential impacts of equipping first responders," according to a news release from McKenzie.

"Windsor is one of the last remaining medium-sized cites in Ontario that does not equip its first responders with this tool."

McKenzie is asking for a report to understand benefits, risks and cost implications related to equipping emergency personnel with naloxone.

Windsor police have said they will not carry naloxone kits. (Marchese Health Care)

At least one other already supports first responders carrying naloxone.

"I think in the big picture, what we've had with some of the opioid crisis and what not if we could save a couple of lives that would be good," said Ward 8 Coun. Gary Kashak, adding the Windsor Police Association supports front-line officers carrying naloxone. 

As of Monday, Windsor Fire had no plans to carry naloxone. Windsor police have said they will not carry naloxone kits.

With files from Chris Ensing

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