Windsor·Video

Ontario automotive company set to produce N95 masks

The owners of Harbour Technologies, David Glover and Andrew Glover, say they are taking on a task that no one else in the country is doing — producing N95 masks. 

Owners optimistic masks will be certified and in production next month

Harbour Technologies, which usually works in the automotive and nuclear sectors, spent months getting its production facility ready to make the much needed medical equipment. 1:57

The owners of Harbour Technologies, David Glover and Andrew Glover, say they are taking on a task that no one else in the country is doing — producing N95 masks. 

The company, which usually works in the automotive and nuclear sectors, spent months getting its production facility ready to make the much-needed medical equipment.

Andrew Glover, left, and David Glover, right, are the owners of Harbour Technologies. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

David said they will have a stamp of certification from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which he added has yet to be achieved in Canada.

He said they started to explore the idea in March to help increase the amount of PPE.

The company usually works in the automotive and nuclear sectors. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

"It's designed primarily for front line workers. When we started the process, that was our main focus," said David.

There was a learning curve when the company switched to making medical equipment, Andrew said, adding "the skill set is still the same."

The company is currently in its machining and fabrication phase. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

A few months ago, Windsor-Essex healthcare workers went through great lengths for medical supplies.

Canadian-made product

While Windsor Regional Hospital has procured half a million surgical grade N95 masks which hospital CEO David Musyj, said should last a year at the current rate of use, he said it would be excellent news if the company could provide a Canadian-made product — though it has yet to be certified.

David said the materials from the nose piece to the elastics as well as the engineering and equipment are all Canadian-made.

The company is optimistic the masks will be approved and can ramp up production by July.   

With files from Jacob Barker

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