Windsor

MPP, advocacy group calling on government to deliver on well water testing promises

Essex NDP MPP Taras Natyshak has again called on the Progressive Conservative government to look into the well water in Chatham-Kent and Sarnia. 

'He's known about this problem since 2012' says one advocate

Two Chatham residents hold up a jar of water from their well that they say is unsafe to drink because of contaminates. (Chris Ensing/CBC)

Essex NDP MPP Taras Natyshak has again called on the Progressive Conservative government to look into the well water in Chatham-Kent and Sarnia. 

During the last election, residents in the region asked the PCs to investigate sediment findings after 80 families said they had to filter their water.

Kevin Jacobec, co-founder of Water Wells First, wants to know why the government hasn't delivered on its promise to help.

"He's known about this problem since 2012," said Jacobec about Ontario Premier Doug Ford. "You've made promises. Why haven't you delivered on those promises?"

Since 2016, Water Wells First — a advocacy group of concerned residents from the Chatham area — has met to discuss the impact of ground vibrations and their impact on wells. 

MPP Natyshak said this renewed call is a "continuation of the fight" to protect the area's water. 

"For over 100 years these people had clean, pristine drinking water from their wells," said Natyshak. The advocacy group believes the well water has been disturbed due to wind farm construction. 

"They seem to be more focused on access to beer rather than access to clean drinking water," said Natyshak about the PC government. 

Natyshak said the area residents are asking for a study to be done, and brought the matter up in question period this week. 

The minister of infrastructure, Monte McNaughton, said the province has been "working hard" on the issue. McNaughton is the MPP for Lambton-Kent-Middlesex.

"We need to see definitive action taken. Not promises," said Jacobec. "We've heard those for too many months now."

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