Windsor

WATCH: Global Fibre Recovery accused of exploitation

A rally against a Windsor business accused of taking advantage of its employees is planned for Monday afternoon.

The Windsor Workers' Action Centre alleges Global Fiber Recovery owes some of its employees thousands of dollars in unpaid wages.

A local action group says a recycling company owes employees thousand in unpaid wages 2:09

A rally against a Windsor business accused of taking advantage of its employees is planned for Monday afternoon.

The Windsor Workers' Action Centre alleges Global Fiber Recovery owes some of its employees thousands of dollars in unpaid wages.

The company recycles shoes and clothing and ships them in bulk to countries around the world.

The action centre's spokesman Paul Chislett says many of the workers are newcomers to Canada and do not know what their rights are.

"These are people that have experienced violence and war. And it's hard for us Canadian-born citizens to really appreciate how many different various forms violence takes when this happens it dredges up a lot of feelings because they are being re-victimized," Chislett said.

Chislett said he contacted the owner, Samuel Pabi, to advocate for an employee. The worker received a cheque, but it bounced, according to Chislett.

The CBC was told Pabi was the sole spokesperson for Global Fibre and that he was out of town and unavailable for comment. No one at Global Fiber was available for comment.

19 claims against company

The ministry of labour confirmed to CBC there are 19 claims against the Windsor firm related to unpaid wages. There are 11 ministry orders for Global Fibre Recovery to pay wage claims ranging from about $900 to $3,000.

Most of those orders have been sent to a collections agency because the company hasn't paid up.

Chislett said this isn't the first time the family who owns the recycling business hasn't paid employees. In 2002, when the company was based in Toronto under another name, it faced similar claims. Chislett said after pressure from Toronto activists the company closed and left town, only to resurface in Windsor.

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