Windsor

Walk for Justice on Windsor waterfront continues fight against racism near and far

A Walk for Justice was held on the Windsor Waterfront Sunday, to keep the spotlight on systemic racism here in Windsor, in Canada, and other injustices happening in places near and far.

Attendance smaller than expected after event accidentally listed as virtual

A Walk for Justice took place on the Windsor waterfront Sunday afternoon. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

A Walk for Justice was held on the Windsor Waterfront Sunday, to keep the spotlight on systemic racism here in Windsor, in Canada, and other injustices happening in places near and far. 

"It was just letting our community know we're still here working on things," event organizer Joi Hurst Morrison said. "As long as there are issues in our community, we're going to come out." 

Attendance at the march was smaller than expected as the online invitation accidentally marked the event as virtual, said organizers, but some attendees got the last minute message to come down to support the march in person. 

Joi Hurst Morrison of the Coalition for Justice Unity Equity addresses the crowd at Sunday's Walk for Justice. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

"We did have a lot of people following along online," Hurst said. "We know where their hearts are. We've got tons of messages."

Hurst, who is with the coalition of for Justice Unity Equity said calls to defund police have sparked conversations with city officials and the police service to make meaningful changes.

"Everybody has to be accountable," Hurst said.

"We want changes within that police force, we want changes within our government here and that's the only way to do it is by us all working together."

'My cause'

Marquez Borders came out to the event holding a sign saying "Justice for Kamia," a reference to Kamia Barry, a 40-year-old Windsor man who was killed in a two-car collision in May.

Marquez Borders came to bring attention to the death of Kamia Barry. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

Friends and family have criticized police for taking three months to lay charges — which included a charge of impaired driving causing death — against the other driver, a 34-year-old woman from Chatham.  

At the time, police said the long wait was because "these investigations do take a significant amount of time and resources to complete."

"This is my cause," Borders, who identified himself as Barry's brother-in-law, said. "I'm here to make sure the whole movement just doesn't die down." 

Actor and activist Leslie McCurdy gave a passionate speech at Sunday's March for Justice. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

Leslie McCurdy, an activist and actor, also spoke at the walk. She reminded people to keep showing up and keep the conversation going.

"Fewer and fewer people are attending every protest," she said.

"Now some of us are back to work, we're back to our lives, we're getting comfortable," said McCurdy. "We have to keep it mattering, we have to keep staying involved. We have to stand on guard to make sure our country is the country we want it to be."

For more stories about the experiences of Black Canadians — from anti-Black racism to success stories within the Black community — check out Being Black in Canada, a CBC project Black Canadians can be proud of. You can read more stories here.

(CBC)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jacob Barker

Videojournalist

Jacob Barker is a videojournalist for CBC Windsor.

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