Windsor

New UWindsor president says it's a 'privilege to join the community'

Rob Gordon starts in September in his new role, replacing Alan Wildeman who retired one year ago. 

'Our student experience is second to none'

(wlu.ca and CBC)

There's a new president at the University of Windsor.

Rob Gordon starts in September in his new role, replacing Alan Wildeman who retired one year ago. 

Gordon was previously the provost and vice president of academics at Wilfred Laurier University.

His career started at Dalhousie University, and moved to be the dean of the Ontario Agricultural College at the University of Guelph. 

Now, as he steps into his new role, he's excited to be part of what he calls a "comprehensive" university.

"One of my lifelong commitments has been in making sure we excel in overall excellence as well as academic research," said Gordon. "Our student experience is second to none."

Gordon said he wants to take advantage of the programs that exist already at the University of Windsor. 

"I want to make sure we continue to move on those at Windsor," said Gordon. "I'm confident there will be opportunities for us to build as a progressive university."

According to Gordon, he's hoping to make sure graduates are positioned to be career-ready, calling that an "important metric."

"I'm looking forward to moving on some innovative partnerships within the agricultural industry," said Gordon, bringing his experience in the agricultural sector to his focus on research. 

One of the things Gordon said is important to him is making sure international students have the same supports and services that domestic students do. 

Gordon said the reputation of Windsor makes it a "real privilege" to come here.

"A strong foundation with the community, well-aligned with alumni, partners throughout the region," listed Gordon. "I'm enthusiastic and looking forward to joining the community over the next few months."

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