Windsor

Crown drops animal cruelty charges in starved dog case

The Crown chose to drop the charges of causing distress to an animal and failing to provide adequate food recently because there was not a reasonable prospect of conviction, according to Windsor-Essex County Humane Society executive director Melanie Coulter, whose organization carried out the investigation in the dog's death.

WARNING: This story contains disturbing images and details

Animal cruelty against a Windsor man accused of starving a dog to death have been dropped. (CBC)

Animal cruelty against a Windsor man accused of starving a dog to death have been dropped.

The Crown chose to drop the charges of causing distress to an animal and failing to provide adequate food recently because there was not a reasonable prospect of conviction, according to Windsor-Essex County Humane Society executive director Melanie Coulter, whose organization carried out the investigation in the dog's death.

"It's very disappointing," she said. "Our officers worked really hard to try to get justice for this dog and we stand behind the investigation — but we also understand the Crown is the one who has to meet that high burden in court and we respect the decision in the matter."

The charges came after the emaciated remains of a black and white dog were found near an abandoned building at the corner of Louis Avenue and Cataraqui Street in March.

The dog's remains were found near an abandoned building in Windsor. (Humane Society)

At the time, Coulter described the case as disturbing and said the animal's body had no muscle tissue left when its body was discovered.

On Monday, the executive director said the outcome of the case provides a reminder for the public.

"If you see something that you're concerned about, call," said Coulter. "This dog didn't starve overnight. It happened over a period of time and unfortunately, trying to gather information after he'd passed away is a lot more difficult than if we had been able to investigate while he was still alive."