Smog study shows 'significant decreases' in pollutants in Ontario

The 2015 Air Quality Report shows a significant decrease in smog-causing pollutants in Ontario's air. The government credits its rules for industry that cut emissions, as well as eliminating coal-fired power plants and Drive Clean emissions testing for vehicles.

There were no smog days in 2015, compared to 53 a decade earlier

Smog billows from chimneys and cooling towers of a steel plant during hazy weather in Taiyuan, Shanxi province, China, December 28, 2016. (Reuters)

Take a deep breath.

That breath you just took is cleaner than it was 10 years ago, according to a new study released by the province.

 The 2015 Air Quality Report shows a significant decrease in smog-causing pollutants in Ontario's air.

"Today's report confirms that Ontario's actions to reduce air pollution are working," wrote Glen Murray, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change in a media release. " We have seen substantial progress in the last 10 years, and we're committed to doing more to improve air quality and ensure a healthier, cleaner environment now and for future generations."

There were no smog advisories issued in 2015. Compare that to a decade earlier, when there was 53.

The government credits its rules for industry that cut emissions, as well as eliminating coal-fired power plants and Drive Clean emissions testing for vehicles.