Windsor

'She was attacked and left to die,' Humane Society says of harmless snake

Who used rocks to smash a harmless snake to death on Windsor's waterfront? That's what the Windsor-Essex Humane Society wants to know.
A northern watersnake was likely sunning itself when someone smashed it to death with rocks on the banks of the Detroit River. (Windsor-Essex Humane Society)

Who used rocks to smash a harmless snake to death on Windsor's waterfront? That's what the Windsor-Essex Humane Society wants to know.

A northern watersnake was found dead in a pile of rocks Monday in the area of Riverside Drive and Parent Avenue, the Humane Society's Melanie Coulter said.

Coulter said the Humane Society consulted a snake expert who said the snake died at the hands of a human and not another animal. She also said rocks didn't simply fall on the snake and kill it.

"It's a concern because, just because she's not a dog or cat doesn't mean she didn't suffer. She was attacked and left there to die," Coulter said. "If this was a dog or cat pelted with rocks and left to die, everyone would be horrified.

"While snakes may not be everyone's favourite animal, they are a part of our ecosystem and can suffer like any other animal."

Coulter called the death "completely unnecessary."

A post on the Humane Society's Facebook page says the snake was likely sunning itself on some rocks near the Detroit River when it was attacked.

"Violence against animals is wrong," Coulter said.

Whoever killed the snake could face charges of causing distress to an animal, and jail time of up to two years, Coulter said.

The northern watersnake is currently listed as not at risk under the Ontario Endangered Species Act and not at risk under the federal Species at Risk Act.

However, the species has been designated as a specially protected reptile under the Ontario Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, meaning the snake and its habitat have some special protection.

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