Windsor

'Recognizing feelings' better for boys than 'war games' and roughhousing, says Windsor daycare worker

A new reference guide called 'Better supporting our boys' has been sent to dozens of daycares in Quebec and encourages staff to allow roughousing, especially for boys who sometimes have a tougher time adapting to school than girls.

Quebec report suggests creating an 'environment that is conducive to building a masculine identity'

(John Mayer/flickr cc)

A Windsor daycare supervisor disagrees with  a report from Quebec community groups that encourages "war games and battle games" as ways for young boys to learn social skills.

The new reference guide called 'Better supporting our boys' has been sent to dozens of daycares in Quebec and encourages staff to allow roughousing, especially for boys who sometimes have a tougher time adapting to school than girls.

It highlights six "winning practices" that include a reference to creating an "environment that is conducive to building a masculine identity."

At Kinder Academy in Windsor, supervisor Melissa Cammallari suggested there are better ways for children to get physical play and learn social skills.

"We like to encourage working through our problems, recognizing our feelings and taking ownership of our actions," she explained.

At Kinder Academy in Windsor, supervisor Melissa Cammallari suggests working through problems and taking ownership of actions are better ways to teach children social skills. (Meg Roberts/CBC)

It's a difficult balance, she added, but it's important to limit physical aggression while encouraging imagination.

Getting used to daycare can be tough for both boys and girls, according to Cammallari, but it's more typical for boys to take rough play too far.

"I think they get very involved in their play and lose touch with what's going on around them," she said. "Any time that the children are really hands-on with another child a lot of times it's just because they don't understand their own physical strength and they don't have a means to control that."

With files from CBC Montreal

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