Windsor·Q&A

D.A. Lockhart's Indigenous poetry books speaks to famous Canadians

'Devil in the Woods' is the newest work from writer D.A. Lockhart, who joined Windsor Morning's Peter Duck in studio last week to chat about the poems and the upcoming launch. 

'It's about capturing voices' says writer

D.A. Lockhart, joined Windsor Morning's Peter Duck in studio last week to chat about the poems and the upcoming launch.  (Angelica Haggert/CBC)

"Dear Maestro ... Sincerely, J.W."

A new letter-style poetry book will be available for sale Sunday, with subjects including Sarah Polley, k.d. Lang, Don Cherry and Rob Ford — all in one book. 

'Devil in the Woods' is the newest work from writer D.A. Lockhart, who joined Windsor Morning's Peter Duck in studio last week to chat about the poems and the upcoming launch. 

Why did you choose this format to address famous Canadians?

It's very conversational. I remember when I was younger I used to write letters to people. It's a way of making something very personal. When it comes to Indigenous poetry and poetry in general, it's about capturing voices.

Why did you choose the famous Canadians you chose?

I grew up experiencing what it was like to be a young Canadian in the 80s and 90s and a lot of these figures stood out to me. 

Dear Don. It's been a long time since we saw eye to eye on anything ... always remember we are nothing without linesmen who talk quick enough to keep us honest.- D.A Lockhart, excerpt of a letter-poem to Don Cherry

Your book is called 'Devil in the Woods.' How does that mesh with the content of the book?

This was playing with a lot of traditional white Canadian tropes of the woods and the wilderness to be some evil haunted place. I wanted to capture that cult, colonial look at the woods. As Indigenous, we're so strongly connected to the woods, we're part of the natural environment. 

Questions and answers have been edited for clarity and length. Listen to the full interview by tapping on the player below.

What do Sarah Polley, K.D. Lang, Robertson Davies, Don Cherry and Rob Ford all have in common? An Indigenous poet from Windsor has a lot to say about prominent non-Indigenous Canadians in a newly-published book. Peter Duck speaks to D.A. Lockhart. 8:02

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