Windsor

Pedestrian, cycling path approved for south Windsor neighbourhood

City council agreed Monday to add a link to make it easier for people in the Rockport neighbourhood to get to bus stops, and future bike lanes on the 6th Concession. 

Dilkens said it will take five or six years to know if there's a problem that exists

A pedestrian and cycling path has been approved for a south Windsor neighbourhood. (Larry Leeder)

A pedestrian and cycling path has been approved for a new subdivision in Windsor's south end.

City council agreed Monday to add a link that would make it easier for people in the Rockport neighbourhood to get to bus stops, and future bike lanes on the Sixth Concession. 

Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkens was not a fan of the proposal, saying that similar pathways have led to problems in other neighbourhoods. 

"They end up causing a lot of friction with the neighbours who are in the surrounding area," said Dilkens. "There ends up being vandalism and all sorts of petty crime that happen there. I'm hoping we're not replicating a problem."

Dilkens said it will take five or six years to know if there's a problem. 

"Perhaps this [path] will allow easier access to bus stops and to communities and achieve the sort of notional goal that we hope it will achieve," said Dilkens.

Council was deciding between two options brought forward by the Development and Heritage standing committee. The original plan, presented to the committee in February 2019 did not provide direct access to Sixth Concession. Council went with the second choice.

The plan requires the pedestrian and cycling connection to not be installed until improvements are in place on Sixth Concession. The timing of that work is unknown. 

City staff were also reluctant to recommend the path, because of ongoing maintenance costs.

Council members who voted in favour of the plan said it is important to make room for active transportation whenever possible. 

"I heard about maybe some issues previously, but this is a different time," said Coun. Jim Morrison. "This is when we are really promoting active transportation. To sit here and to start making decisions that go against active transportation just doesn't sit well."

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