Windsor

13 birds in one bedroom: Windsor woman's mission to rescue parrots

It's an unusual start to becoming an animal rescuer: Shanna Marin first rescued a baby crow she found in the woods when she ran away from home.

'There's so many birds abandoned in Windsor'

Shanna Marin said birds require four hours of interaction with humans or other birds to stay "mentally stable." (Shanna Marin/Facebook)

It's an unusual start to becoming an animal rescuer. Shanna Marin first rescued a baby crow she found in the woods when she ran away from home.

She's now spent the last four years rescuing parrots.

"I decided to start a rescue in the area because there's so many birds abandoned in Windsor in general," said Marin, the proud owner of 13 birds, ranging from a 52-year-old cockatoo to an orange-winged Amazon named Princess.

She turned her bedroom into an indoor aviary, with branches and things for them to climb on. The birds spend most of their day out of the cage, flying around the house. 

She sleeps in the same room because some of the birds have anxiety.

"I like to sleep there so if they freak out, I can turn the lights on and let them know they'll be okay."

According to Marin, the birds come from hoarding situations or some come from people who couldn't handle the birds as pets.

Shanna Marin shares her home with 13 parrots. (Shanna Marin/Facebook)

Some of her birds are what Marin calls "permanent residents," and she only takes in about four rescues for rehoming at a time. Marin said it can be expensive to rescue these birds, as vet bills can leave a $250 dent per checkup.

When it comes to finding homes for the birds she's rescued, Marin said she takes a long time to decide if a potential owner is the right one.

"I'm very picky. It's pretty hard [to find a home]," said Marin. "A lot of people don't have the time for them."

Marin said birds require four hours of interaction with humans or other birds to stay "mentally stable." Birds also bond with people "for life" — so she said owners should make sure they will outlive whatever bird they choose to take in.

With files from Windsor Morning

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