Windsor

OPP officer giving up his motorcycle after seeing dangerous driving

One OPP officer is getting off his motorbike and calling for all drivers to respect each other on the roads after three serious motorcycle crashes in less than a week.
Ontario SIU investigators probe a motorcycle crash on Riverside Drive. An OPP officer has decided to quit driving his motorcycle after visiting with three crash victims in the past week. (Alex Brockman/CBC)

One OPP officer is getting off his motorbike and calling for all drivers to respect each other on the roads after three serious motorcycle crashes in less than a week.

For the past 15 years, OPP Sgt. Dave Rektor has been riding motorcycles recreationally. But he's giving it up after spending time in the hospital with three motorcyclists seriously hurt in separate incidents last week.

"After this week, I'm definitely not getting back on a motorcycle," Rektor said in an interview with CBC's Afternoon Drive host Bob Steele.

"I just can't afford to risk my life at the expense of someone else's error."

Twenty-nine people were killed in collisions involving motorcycles in Ontario this year, provincial police report. Last year 32 people died in those types of collisions.

"It doesn't matter if you're in the right or if you're in the wrong. If you are hit by a car going highway speeds, you are going to be injured," Rektor said.

Motorcyclists and non-motorcyclists alike share the blame for these collisions, Rektor said. Over the past few days, police officers have clocked motorcycles going faster than 200 km/h and popping wheelies on the highway.

'Until everybody buys in and takes part of the ownership of the problems, they'll continue," Rektor said. "There's no magic to this. You have to stop at an intersection, no matter what vehicle you're on, look both ways, take a few seconds."

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