Windsor

Council votes to ask government to convert Ojibway Shores to protected land

"It's a piece worth fighting for," said Mayor Drew Dilkens, who added the city has plans to meet with the Windsor Port Authority, which currently owns the land, to "find a way forward."

13-hectare natural area on Windsor's west side is considered an ecological gem

The 13-hectare natural area on the west side of Windsor is considered an ecological gem and is currently being managed by the Windsor Port Authority. (Essex County Field Naturalists’ Club)

Windsor City Council has agreed to ask the Canadian government to convert Ojibway Shores into protected land.

The decision was reached during the Monday-night council meeting.

The property is owned by the federal government but controlled by the Windsor Port Authority. According to the organization's website, the port authority plans to develop the lands for commercial gain and lists Ojibway Shores as a development site, details which have made environmentalists nervous.

"It is so important to save that property forever," said Tom Henderson from the Detroit River Canadian Cleanup. "The whole idea is to keep the issue in public view." 

Council unanimously endorsed the resolution.

"It's a piece worth fighting for," said Mayor Drew Dilkens, who added the city has plans to meet with the Windsor Port Authority, which currently owns the land, to "find a way forward."

(Jason Viau/CBC)

The 13-hectare natural area on Windsor's west side is considered an ecological gem, which the Detroit River Canadian Cleanup has previously fought to protect "by any means necessary."

Windsor West MP Brian Masse has argued transferring the land would save the port authority money. He also stated the land would make a "wonderful gateway to the Gordie Howe bridge" as well as open the land up to recreation and tourism.