Monarch butterflies by the thousands at Point Pelee

Point Pelee National Park is reporting more than 2,000 monarch butterflies spent the night Tuesday at Canada’s most southern point.
After a devastating drop in population numbers over the past two years, the monarch butterfly is poised to make a comeback this summer. (The Associated Press)

Point Pelee National Park is reporting more than 2,000 monarch butterflies spent the night at Canada’s most southern point.

The park tweeted the information late Tuesday.

“It’s not like the 1990s, but better than the last two years,” Chip Taylor of Monarch Watch said in an email to CBC News.

After a devastating drop in population numbers over the past two years, the monarch butterfly is poised to make a comeback this summer.

Point Pelee is a temporary home to thousands of migrating monarch butterflies.

As soon as favourable conditions occur, they begin one of nature's greatest journeys by crossing Lake Erie. They cannot linger in Leamington, Ont., for long. Their destination is some 3,000 km farther south, in the mountains of central Mexico.

The park is offering free daily shuttle trips to the tip starting at 8 a.m.