Windsor

Michigan's COVID-19 curve starting to flatten, says governor

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said the growth in coronavirus infections is starting to flatten due to the extraordinary restrictions on people's movements.

Michigan has the third highest death toll in the U.S., with 1,600-plus deaths

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addresses the state during a speech in Lansing, Mich., Monday, April 13, 2020. The governor said the state has tough days ahead in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic, but a return to normalcy is "on the horizon." (Michigan Office of the Governor/The Associated Press)

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said the growth in coronavirus infections is starting to flatten due to the extraordinary restrictions on people's movements.

But she warned Monday that this doesn't mean business as usual will resume quickly or soon.

Whitmer said "we've got to make sure that we avoid a second wave at all costs."

Her stay-at-home order is in effect through April 30.

The state has reported 25,635 COVID-19 cases and 1,602 have died as of Tuesday. 

Michigan has the third highest death toll in the U.S.

State buys back alcohol

Meanwhile, the state of Michigan will offer cash-strapped bars and restaurants relief by buying back their liquor inventory during the coronavirus pandemic.

Whitmer signed an order late Monday authorizing the program.

She also is delaying the expiration of valid driver's licenses and state ID cards and is extending a measure to keep intact a prohibition against dine-in service at restaurants and to continue the closure of many places of public accommodation through April 30.

Michigan's 8,500 on-premises liquor licensees will have until Friday to request that the Liquor Control Commission buy back spirits

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